Read ✓ Shallows By Tim Winton – Airdomains.co.uk

Read ✓ Shallows By Tim Winton – Airdomains.co.uk
  • Shallows
  • Tim Winton
  • 12 September 2017
  • 9780140274004

ShallowsShallows Is Set In A Small Whaling Town In Western Australia, Where Land Based Whaling Has Been A Tradition For Over 150 Years When Queenie Cookson Decides To Join An Antiwhaling Protest Group, She Defies Her Husband, Her Ancestry, And Her Community Winner Of The Prestigious Miles Franklin Award In Australia, This Eloquent And Moving Novel Speaks With Immediacy And Passion Of The Conflict Between The Values Of A Closeknit, Traditional Society And The Evolving S Of The Wider World The World Here, The Rainy, Closed, Quiet, Claustrophobic World Of The Southern Beach Town Just A Long Stone S Throw Away From Antarctica, Is Perfectly Evoked The Elegance Of Language, The Grandeur Of The Nature Being Described All This Is Dazzling, Dazzling It Makes The Heart Pound Carolyn See, Los Angeles Times Book Review Animating All 150 Years Of The Settlement S History, This Novel Carries The Symbolic Weight Of Its Subject Matter Of Whales And Water And Meaning Of Life As Lightly As A Wind Off The Sea S Hallows Deserves To Find A Permanent Place As A Major Work Of Australian Literature Elizabeth Ward, Washington Post Book World


About the Author: Tim Winton

Tim Winton was born in Perth, Western Australia, but moved at a young age to the small country town of Albany.While a student at Curtin University of Technology, Winton wrote his first novel, An Open Swimmer It went on to win The Australian Vogel Literary Award in 1981, and launched his writing career In fact, he wrote the best part of three books while at university His second book, Shallows


10 thoughts on “Shallows

  1. says:

    This is the book that got me writing my own novel I thought, he s younger than me, he s surfed round Albany, and he s already written 2 national award winners I can have a go A long time down the track and Winton has 22 books and is arguably Australia s most awarded writer I have one, but this is still the book that got me going.An Augustan style tale based around the whaling protests in Albany in the 70s, that were the flashpoint that started the fire that stopped whaling in Australia, paralleled with an emblematic convict yarn of hard settlement, this is still the best Winton book I ve read I moved on after the first 5 That Eye, The Sky and never went ...

  2. says:

    My first exposure to Tim Winton was with his post Cloudstreet works The Rider, Dirt Music, Breath After those three novels, I read Cloudstreet, the work that has become an Australian institution I then decided to read his pre Cloudstreet novels An Open Swimmer, Shallows, That Eye That Sky, In the Winter Dark , anticipating a less mature production However, to my surprise, Winton s voice in those first four works was surprisingly strong.Of the four, Shallows seems closer in style and tone to his later works If, indeed, he seems somewhat less assured in the other three of his first novels, with Shallows, the descriptions of place are breathtaking, the dialogue, pitch perfect and the themes death, loss, family, redemption are played out with great reflective force.One new revelation hit me and that is Winton s comedic vein a gentle nod to a magic realism that re emerges in That Eye, the Sky and Cloudstreet His characters are often overwhelmingly somber they struggle with their pasts and are not always optimistic about their futures They are common people leading uncommon common lives Shallows ends on a vividly tragic note, leaving the reader with an image that jolts But amid the somber and the jolting, images like that of Des Pustling losing his teeth from bloodless gums or of Daniel Coupar traveling from his home to Angelus on a tractor are light hearted and playful That playfulness is repeated in his other works.The plot does move slowly and some reviewers have found that move...

  3. says:

    Winton s a wonderful writer and chronicler of all things Australian Here he takes on whales, the whaling culture, the anti whaling culture, the burdens of family and history and per usual, the mystery that is the rlationship between men and women Not bad for 235 pages that could easily have been bloated to double that I guess someone had to write a short novel about whaling Unlike many of his compatriots, Winton writes strong and compelling female characters Queenie...

  4. says:

    The conclusion of this novel left me with a sense of hopelessness In fact, the novel felt like it has a pervading sense of gloom throughout The many characters are intensely morose.Yes, it s a serious subject that deserves intense consideration, but without the usual Winton humour it has a feeling of drab flatness, no pathway to redemption, just resignation and perhaps rightly so, since we are still defending the whales from human exploitation...

  5. says:

    He is good that Tim Winton fellow I hadn t heard of this book and neither had the friends I asked Set in Angelus Albany whaling industry protesters 3 different periods of history.He is a bit of a master Quite a powerful book Think ...

  6. says:

    I decided to give this book 3 stars because, while I didn t particularly enjoy it, I think it still addresses some important and interesting issues that are still relevant today, such as environmental animal activism and the questioning of tradition This is the first Tim Winton book I have read, and I was disappointed that I didn t enjoy it, given the frequency with which some of his other titles appear on lists of the best Australian literature, and also because I was drawn in by the ominous one word title I didn t feel connected with the story or characters Throughout, it felt as though I really was an outsider, or simply watching the story play out without really having any true understanding or inclusion in the character s lives This disconnection was yet another source of disappointment for me, as I do feel that the issues covered in the story are very relevant to myself and to the world today For example, the fishing and whaling industries are still or damaging now, and there is still a conflict between tradition humans have always eaten and used sea creatures and should continue to do so and ethics the fact that we continue to over fish in the name of tradition and money despite knowing the negative impacts it is having on the environment and species Being someone that cares about the environment a lot, I really wanted to feel some sort of emotional connection with t...

  7. says:

    I ve read four other books by this author and enjoyed them greatly This book was a struggle to get through I get why it won such critical praise its sparse, at times poetic, and tackles important issues of the time it was written, but for me it was very slow going None of the characters were all that interesting, and even from the very beginning I kept wondering ...

  8. says:

    I had to read this for school Everyone including me hated it and put me off reading Winton for years Luckily I tried Dirt Music and he won me over in a big way, and I ve loved everything he s written since Wondering whether I should give this another try Was it just no...

  9. says:

    I don t know why I keep coming back to Tim Winton, when I ve struggled and not enjoyed his style before For some reason I thought the movie The Shallows was an adaptation of this novel and I wanted to see the movie The movie now I ve seen...

  10. says:

    Didn t hold my interest.

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