➽ All the Fishes Come Home to Roost Free ➳ Author Rachel Manija Brown – Airdomains.co.uk

All the Fishes Come Home to Roost When She Was Seven, Rachel Manija Brown S Parents, Post 60s Hippies, Uprooted Her From Her Native California And Moved To An Ashram In A Cobra Ridden, Drought Stricken Spot In India Cavorting Through These Pages Are Some Wonderfully Eccentric Characters The Ashram Head, Meher Baba, Best Known As The Guru To Pete Townshend Of The Who The Librarian, Who Grunts And Howls Nightly Outside Rachel S Window A Holy Madman, Who Shuffles About Collecting Invisible Objects A Middle Aged Male Virgin, Who Begs Rachel To Critique His Epic Spiritual Poems And A Delusional Russian Who Arrives At The Ashram Proclaiming He Is Meher Baba Reincarnated.Astutely Observed And Laugh Out Loud Funny, All The Fishes Come Home To Roost Is An Astonishing Debut Memoir Now Available In Paperback And The Arrival Of A Major New Literary Talent The Hardcover Edition Was Named A Book Sense Pick And Was Selected As A Book Of The Week By BN.com S Book Club.

10 thoughts on “All the Fishes Come Home to Roost

  1. says:

    This memoir is about a seven year old white girl whose parents take her to Ahmednagar, India to live in an ashram with disciples of Baba, a spiritual leader deceased at the time who claimed he was God and Jesus and Krishna and Buddha and just about everyone else She is the only foreign child there At the ashram, she s surrounded by wackaloons whose explanation for everything is Baba s will, and at school, she s surrounded by kids who throw rocks at her for being an outsider and teachers This memoir is about a seven year old white girl whose parents take her to Ahmednagar, India to live in an...

  2. says:

    Read this over Thanksgiving and have been mulling it about in my little brain since then On the surface, this is a decently written memoir about a girl dragged off to India by her ex hippie parents to live in an Ashram dedicated to the life and teachings of Meher Baba There are some humorous parts, some heartbreaking parts The thing that makes this different for me is that I know just about every person who appears in this memoir book disclaimer the names have ...

  3. says:

    I predict that this will be the least cogent review of a book I ever give.Toward the very end of this book, the author describes how she decided to write about her childhood, and break her silence on the misery she d endured She spent a long time thinking of everyone else who would be hurt by her sharing her memories, but eventually decided that breaking the silence, and finding her voice, was most important.That was round about the moment I realized this book had been hammering away at m...

  4. says:

    This book is probably the best evidence I ve seen that just because you have a story to tell, doesn t mean you should write a book My mother picked this up, and after reading the blurb we were both keen to read it as it sounded like a very interesting read I nabbed it to read it first, which almost entirely meant that I got the honour of reading out the most self congratulatory, precocious, annoying snippets for us to mutually poke fun at or grimace at how this ever got published While it has This book is probably the best evidence I ve seen that just because you have a story to tell, doesn t mean you should wr...

  5. says:

    I really wanted to give it 3.5 stars This book hit home for me in many ways I don t want to make this review about me, but let me say that I have spent time in India, in an Ashram a different one and then 5 years simply living there nothing to do with the mentioned Ashram So I could easily identify with Rachel and the people she lived with And yes India is really that insane All of it.Bizarre things happen on a daily basis I KNOW This book for me was like looking in a mirror in some I really wanted to give it 3.5 stars This book hit home for me in many ways I don t want to make this review about me, but let me say that I have spent time in India, in an Ashram a different one and then 5 years simply living there nothing to do with the mentioned Ashram So I could easily identify with Rachel and the people she lived with And yes India is really that insane All of it.Bizarre things happen on a daily basis I KNOW This book for me was like looking in a mirror in some wayslike looking into a shared past,like visiting home It made me miss aspects of the life I had there Wellit brought those feelings to the forefront I think about India frequently, my experience waspositive If you are curious about Indialife in India..the peopleetc, take a leap..read this book Keep in mind the author is dealing with her issues so we are sharing her crap But we all have crap And its funny I had several laugh out loud moments And I can say that I have been inspired.maybe o...

  6. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here also posted on LJ content is the same I ve been wanting to read this book, the author s memoir of years spent as the lone child in an ashram in hot and dusty central India, for quite some time I m interested in the emotional costs of alternative lifestyles, in how children cope with the untenable situations they sometimes find themselves in, and what sense they make of their caregivers decisions.I was wary as I approached the book because I knew, from Rachel s blogging, some of the things sh also posted on LJ content is the same I ve been wanting to read this book, the author s memoir of years spent as the lone child in an ashram in hot and dusty central India, for quite some time I m interested in the emotional costs of alternative lifestyles, in how children cope with the untenable situations they sometimes find themselves in, and what sense they make of their caregivers decisions.I was wary as I approached the book because I knew, from Rachel s blogging, some of the things she d suffered as a kid, and I thought the book had ...

  7. says:

    Rachel Manija Brown s memoir of her childhood in an ashram in India, where she was brought by her cult following parents, is surprisingly humorous and good natured While acknowledging that her parents are nuts, she conveys their benign qualities as well as their quirks with a wry sense of detachment That she survived the brutality of bullying in a fifth rate backwater Catholic school, where the other children habitually pelted her with rocks and where the teachers beat students with rulers or Rachel Manija Brown s memoir of her childhood in an ashram in India, where she was brought by her cult following parents, is surprisingly humorous and good natured While acknowledging that her parents are nuts, she conveys their benign qualities as well as their quirks with a wry sense of detachment That she survived the brutality of b...

  8. says:

    A catalogue of horrors, told quite wittily Self involved parents, brutal Catholic school, certifiable ashram lunatics RMB s mother chides her at the end for not writing about happier times Mani replies The trouble is that one extreme experience ismemorable than many normal ones I could see why Mom thought I ought to have writtenabout baking cookies and less about decapitations But the decapitations had madeof an impression on me The book ends with Mani looking at a A catalogue of horrors, told quite wittily Self involved parents, brutal Catholic school, certifiable ashram lunatics RMB s mother chides her at the end for not writing about happier times Mani replies The trouble is that one extreme experience ismemorable than many n...

  9. says:

    FABULOUS This book was nimble, elegant, wise and funny as hell The author s childhood encompassed everything from the gruesome to the bizarre, but instead of taking a self pitying tone which she could have quite easily done , she finds humor and love however misguided in the adults around her In doing so, she conveys how she has grown up and learned to see the silly, wayward hippies who raised her with compassion.I admire her technique and the rich portraits she paints of guru smitten s FABULOUS This book was nimble, elegant, wise and funny as hell The author s childhood encompassed everything from the gruesome to the bizarre, but instead of taking a self pitying tone which she could have quite easily done , she finds humor and love however misguided in the adults around her In doing so, she conveys how she has grown up and learned to see the silly, wayward hippies who raise...

  10. says:

    In this memoir, All the Fishes Come Home to Roost Rachael Manija Brown, starts it off with a quote by George Bernard Shaw __ If you have skeletons in your closet, you may as well make them dance.__ and that is exactly what she has done The author writes very descriptively, so wonderful to read. It is sometimes quite funny, often a bit horrifying, but everything she describes and goes through, give us an amazingly interesting story.Rachael or Mani as she was called while there, had a pretty t In this memoir, All the Fishes Come Home to Roost Rachael Manija Brown, starts it off with a quote by George Bernard Shaw __ If you have skeletons in your closet...

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